Sustainability economics

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The world’s economies are increasingly realising that a more active and diverse approach is needed to address climate change and that doing so through the low carbon agenda can bring new opportunities for both the public and private sectors. Green growth, green jobs and green stimulus packages are becoming more common as policy makers look to turn climate change and environmental threats into sustainable advantage. 

 

Our economists and specialists work with governments, businesses, policy makers and multilateral organisations to:

Perform robust and transparent economic modelling to develop and implement sustainable green growth strategies that consider social and environmental impacts.

Understand the right form of environmental and climate policy or strategy for the local context – maximizing environmental integrity and cost-effectiveness and being aware of competitiveness impacts.

Help organisations - public sector and private - become ‘climate smart’. That means taking full advantage of cost saving opportunities and making sure that business models are resilient to change – climate change, economic change or regulatory change.

Interpret the impact of policy announcements on your proposed or ongoing low carbon business opportunities.

Understand and quantify the environmental and social benefits and costs of your organisation’s current operations and practices: see TIMM.

 

TIMM:

http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/sustainability/publications/total-impact-measurement-management.html

 

Blog:

http://pwc.blogs.com/sustainability/ 

 

The Low Carbon Economy Index

 

Pathway to two degress

This year marks a step change in the decarbonisation of the global economy. For the last 15 years the global decarbonisation rate has averaged only 1.3% a year. In the lead up to the Paris Agreement in December 2015 carbon intensity fell by a record-breaking 2.8% (up from 2.7% in 2014). Some major emerging economies, including China, showed sharp reductions in carbon intensity last year. In addition several countries saw sharp falls in coal consumption. These may be the first signs of the uncoupling of emissions from economic growth. 

Read the full analysis

Contact us

Robert Milnes
Manager
Tel: +[852] 2289 1150
Email

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